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Baseball Clubs’ Christmas Wish List: Teams Send Greetings, But Have Plenty of Needs

The Detroit Tigers sent out an awesome link to a holiday card to their fans. For fans who just see the e-mailed message, which also serves as the second-to-last page of the card, you are missing an excellent piece of work.

The team’s simple holiday greeting states: “May the spirit of the season be with you always. – The Detroit Tigers.” The link then takes you to a card that shows holiday words and pictures of the Tigers showing the meaning of the word.

It starts out with “Peace” and then a picture of pitching ace Justin Verlander in a reflective state with head bowed.

It continues with:

  • “Love” and a picture of third baseman Brandon Inge with a heart-transplant recipient.
  • “Joy” and manager Jim Leland and Ryan Raburn celebrating after Raburn’s walk-off homer in June.
  • “Giving” and Raburn, Armando Galarraga, Migel Cabrera and Clete Thomas donating items to the American Red Cross.
  • “Tradition” and the 25th anniversary reunion of the 1984 championship team.
  • “Spirit” and representatives of General Motors, Chrysler and Ford throwing out the ceremonial first pitch on Opening Day.

It then closes with the previously mentioned greeting – and concludes with “Always a Tiger!”

By far, the best of the holiday greetings sent out by Major League Baseball teams.

The Atlanta Braves’ simple greeting stated :

“HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE BRAVES”

“The entire Atlanta Braves organization would like to extend our warmest Holiday wishes to you and your family. We hope you have a safe and happy holiday season, and look forward to seeing you at Turner Field. Go Braves!”

There is the grammar faux pas of capitalizing “Holiday” in sentence 1, but not in sentence 2 (Sentence 2 is correct.). Could it be visions of “Braves sign Matt Holliday” press releases dancing in the public relations department’s heads? But the faux pas aside, it is a nice gesture.

The Baltimore Orioles went more Hallmark in their approach and didn’t even mention baseball in their greeting which appears after a snowy oriole serves as the card’s cover page.

“May the joy and magic of the Holiday season be yours.

“And may you expierence the very best in the New Year.”

Again, a little lax in the capitalization, but a great sentiment nonetheless.

And while some teams’ cyberspace greetings are still to come, most teams have already gotten their Christmas list to the Big Guy (No, not Bud Selig. To a guy who is actually magical and gets things done). And while not divulging sources – let’s just say a little reindeer food goes a long way – here are some of the wishes on Major League teams’ list this year:

  • Chicago White Sox – A fountain of youth. For any shot at success, 42-year-old Omar Vizquel, 32-year-old (but he’s playing much older) Andruw Jones and 32-year-old Juan Pierre will have to return to their former glory days.
  • New York Mets – For a September to remember rather than forget for a change. Also for anyone in the Big Apple to notice they are still there.
  • Pittsburgh Pirates – A winning lottery ticket. This would enable the franchise to actually lock young talent in place rather than continuing to let them fly the coop for fame and fortune.
  • Chicago Cubs – More Gatorade coolers. You never know when a Carlos Zambrano or Milton Bradley tirade will knock out one or two.
  • New York Yankees – The combination to a few of the bank vaults in New York City. Buying championships does not come without expense.
  • Seattle Mariners – A neurolyzer , ala the “Men in Black” movies, for fans to forget that this team once had Alex Rodriguez, Randy Johnson, Ken Griffey Jr., Edgar Martinez and Jay Buehner on the roster at the same time and didn’t win a championship or even an American League title.
  • Boston Red Sox – One or two more bank-vault combinations than the Yankees.
  • Philadelphia Phillies – A Magic 8 Ball for Jimmy Rollins so he can focus more on his hitting with runners in scoring position than his prognasticating.
  • San Francisco Giants – A hair-clipper ban for 25 miles around AT&T Ballpark. Tim Lincecum’s power is coming from somewhere other than that wiry frame.
  • St. Louis Cardinals – A clone of Albert Pujols. It might be the only way the team goes deep into the postseason anytime soon.

Happy Holidays!

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